GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) is a neurotransmitter that is naturally present in the human brain. It plays a crucial role in regulating brain activity, reducing anxiety, and promoting a sense of calm.

GABA works by inhibiting the activity of other neurotransmitters in the brain, such as glutamate. This helps to reduce excitability and promote a sense of calm. When the brain experiences stress or anxiety, levels of GABA are often depleted, leading to an increase in the activity of other neurotransmitters, such as glutamate. By increasing the levels of GABA in the brain, it is possible to reduce anxiety and promote a sense of calm.

One of the main benefits of GABA is its ability to reduce anxiety. This can be particularly helpful for teens, who may be facing increased stress levels due to the demands of school, relationships, and other life events. GABA has been shown to reduce symptoms of anxiety, such as racing thoughts, irritability, and restlessness.

GABA has also been shown to have a calming effect on the brain, which can help to improve sleep quality. This can be especially beneficial for teens, who may have difficulty falling or staying asleep due to stress and anxiety. GABA has been shown to improve sleep quality and reduce symptoms of insomnia.

Another benefit of GABA is that it is well-tolerated and has a low risk of side effects. Unlike some other anxiolytic drugs, GABA does not cause drowsiness or impaired cognitive function. This makes it a safe and effective option for teens who are looking for a natural way to reduce stress and anxiety.

GABA is a naturally occurring neurotransmitter in the human brain that plays a crucial role in reducing anxiety and promoting a sense of calm. By increasing the levels of GABA in the brain, it is possible to reduce symptoms of stress and anxiety and improve sleep quality. Although there are some potential side effects, GABA is generally well-tolerated and has a low risk of adverse effects. If you are a teen who is struggling with stress and anxiety, talk to your doctor about whether GABA may be a good option for you.

References:

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  4. Sung, H. C., Hsu, Y. T., & Hsieh, Y. L. (2015). The effect of GABA supplementation on fat oxidation during exercise in elite male judo athletes. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 12(1), 29.
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